When Clark Kent Quit The Daily Planet

“I was taught to believe you could use words to change the course of rivers — that even the darkest secrets would fall under the harsh light of the sun…But facts have been replaced by opinions. Information has been replaced by entertainment. Reporters have become stenographers. I can’t be the only one who’s sick of what passes for the news today.”

Clark Kent, upon quitting The Daily Planet in 2012.  Everyone expected him to start a blog.

I wonder what the 2012 Kent would think of the current state of…things.

Lost Siegel And Shuster Superman Story To Be Published in New Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman Hardcover Book — Graphic Policy

A new hardcover book, Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman, is being published by DC Entertainment as part of its celebration of the one-thousandth issue of Action Comics—the longest continually published comic book of its kind in history, the series that introduced Superman to the world and the title that launched the superhero genre.…

via Lost Siegel And Shuster Superman Story To Be Published in New Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman Hardcover Book — Graphic Policy

I am so glad that Superman is returning to his classic look, even if I don’t understand the metallic cuffs.  (They really need to go.)

Injustice: Gods Among Us #1 Reviewed

I’m late to this party, but it gives me some perspective.  There are spoilers below, and I don’t mean Stephanie Brown.

If you’re reading this post, you likely already know that the Injustice comics run was a digital-first release by DC in 2013 and a prequel to the eponymous game.  I’ve never played the game, so this won’t be about that.

Issue #1 itself.

The strongest thing in this book was the interaction between Clark and Bruce on the rooftop when Clark tries to tell Bruce that Lois is pregnant and of course, ball buster that he is, Bruce beats him to the punch.  When Clark asks how he knows, you’ve already been down this Batman always knows road so many times  you sort of just want Bruce to mess with him.  The interaction ends beautifully, though, and perfectly.

As for the conceits that get Jimmy and Lois to the docks, I’m not buying.  Do reporters risk their lives to uncover the buying and selling of elected officials?  Have they ever?  Should they?  And if the journalist in question happens to be married to Superman, is it really a step back for feminism to maybe have him ride along on things like this?  Maybe, except for the fact that “I’ll have Jimmy with me.  Because I need a picture,” is offered as reason enough for Superman to go ahead and hang out with Bats instead.  Shoehorning aside, the message seems to be “I don’t need Superman to come with me.  Any man will do.”  So, that’s really a net loss for the cause.  If you hated The Killing Joke for all of the reasons we shouldn’t have read it as 4th graders, what goes down at the docks is hard to take.  Maybe its the Joker’s get up or his evil snark, but the death of Jimmy Olson, shocking as it is, also feels like a cameo from that book.

The biggest take away from this issue, for me, is how awful Superman’s New 52 costume really is.  All of the embellishments take so much away from the sheer grandeur of Superman as an icon.  In a book like this, that’s fine, telegraphing all kinds of complexities.  But as the default visual markings of he most iconic superhero ever, it’s a needless story-telling hurdle.  Two-and-a-half years into the design, I’m convinced it needs to go.   It’s too distracting, too busy, too much.  It gets in the visceral way.

If we’re going to embrace flying men anyway, embrace this.  There’s no reason not to.

Speaking of better versions of Superman costumes, have you seen Val-Zod?

Lawrence O’Donnell Takes Off The Gloves: National Defense Authorization Act, Soft Journalism, and the Spoonfed Two Party System

Taking a cue from the pages of Superman, Lawrence O’Donnell lambasted the mainstream media Wednesday night for their failure to cover the Third Parties debate and for failing to address this little nightmare:

Imagine if Congress passed a bill that the president signed that allowed indefinite detention without charge or trial. That would be issue one at any presidential debate, wouldn’t it? The media’s favorite debate moderator, Martha Raddatz, would have forced a full discussion of that one at the vice presidential debate, wouldn’t she? Well, Congress did pass that law last year and President Obama signed it and he never mentioned it on his list of his accomplishments in any of the debates. And he was never asked about it, not by the media’s second favorite debate moderator, Candy Crowley, and not by Mitt Romney. It never came up at the two-party presidential debates.

Watch the video here.  It starts with the drug war (I’m not for legalization, but am for reform), and if that bothers you, fast forward to the part about the National Defense Authorization Act.  I kind of like how someone on Examiner.com put it:

But in the most shocking segment, O’Donnell laid out a serious charge against President Obama and the failure of the media and the public to hold him responsible due to a certain law that he signed called the National Defense Authorization Act, which according to O’Donnell will allow the government to detain, interrogate, prosecute or just make people who it suspects to be terrorists disappear without a trial of any kind, and this includes American citizens! O’Donnell then blasted all of the moderators of the three presidential debates between Obama and Romney for not bringing this issue up, and then he blasted the cowardly Mitt Romney for also being to [sic] sheepish to ask President Obama about this issue, instead of crowing about how he would repeal Obamacare, when he should be repealing this monstrosity.”

O’Donnell encouraged people to vote for third party candidates, especially in swing states.

Good for you, Larry.  Even if you were a few hours late to the party:

That’s Why He’s Superman: Clark Kent Goes Johnny Paycheck

“I was taught to believe you could use words to change the course of rivers — that even the darkest secrets would fall under the harsh light of the sun…But facts have been replaced by opinions. Information has been replaced by entertainment. Reporters have become stenographers. I can’t be the only one who’s sick of what passes for the news today.”

Clark Kent, quitting The Daily Planet in a well-earned huff.

Reporters have become stenographers.  Nice touch, Scott Lobdell.  That certainly seems true in the national setting of televised news cycles and corporate communications companies.  Thankfully, cities across the country (including Allentown) have great local reporting.  It’s a crying shame that so many of their papers are owned by huge conglomerates and that they’re struggling regardless.

As for the newly emancipated Kent,CNN shares this:  “I don’t think he’s going to be filling out an application anywhere,” Lobdell said. “He is more likely to start the next Huffington Post or the next Drudge Report than he is to go find someone else to get assignments or draw a paycheck from.”

Ah, Superman. You keep finding new ways to fight for us.